This week in the Civil War for March 15, 1865
The Arizona Kid

Spencer Bronson

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Spencer Bronson figured the gunshot he heard was part of the play

Since enlisting in Company B of the Wisconsin 7th Infantry, he had heard many gunshots. Bronson fought valiantly throughout the Civil War with the Iron Brigade — he was captured at Gettysburg, wounded in several battles and still carried a bullet in his right hip when he was sent to a hospital to convalesce. That’s how he ended up in Washington, D.C., at the end of the war.

When Bronson read in a newspaper that President Abraham Lincoln, General Ulysses S. Grant and their wives were going to see “Our American Cousin” at Ford’s Theatre that evening, April 14, 1865, Bronson bought a ticket and walked three blocks from the hospital to the theater.

In chilling detail Bronson wrote to his sister Amanda Bronson back home in Fall River, Wis., what happened next:

"A clang takes place, a dark form is seen to fall from the private box, his spurs catching in the flag as he descends. A second & he recovered & (arising) in a tragical attitude he draws a dagger & with his white face towards the crowd he repeated in Latin ‘So be it ever to tyrants.’"

In his letter to his sister, Spencer Bronson describes the chaotic scene as people shouted “hang him” and “shoot him” after Booth fled through the backstage to a horse waiting outside. 

He saw a distraught Mary Todd Lincoln and heard her screams as men hoisted water and spirits to the box to be given to the dying president.

It was a couple of days before newspapers printed the name and photo of the assassin. But Spencer Bronson, a regular theatergoer, knew immediately who killed Lincoln.

He wrote his sister: "I will also send you a paper with the full account of the affair & also a good portrait of the murderer who

Spencer Bronson figured the gunshot he heard was part of the play

Since enlisting in Company B of the Wisconsin 7th Infantry, he had heard many gunshots. Bronson fought valiantly throughout the Civil War with the Iron Brigade — he was captured at Gettysburg, wounded in several battles and still carried a bullet in his right hip when he was sent to a hospital to convalesce. That’s how he ended up in Washington, D.C., at the end of the war.

When Bronson read in a newspaper that President Abraham Lincoln, General Ulysses S. Grant and their wives were going to see “Our American Cousin” at Ford’s Theatre that evening, April 14, 1865, Bronson bought a ticket and walked three blocks from the hospital to the theater.

In chilling detail Bronson wrote to his sister Amanda Bronson back home in Fall River, Wis., what happened next:

"A clang takes place, a dark form is seen to fall from the private box, his spurs catching in the flag as he descends. A second & he recovered & (arising) in a tragical attitude he draws a dagger & with his white face towards the crowd he repeated in Latin ‘So be it ever to tyrants.’"

In his letter to his sister, Spencer Bronson describes the chaotic scene as people shouted “hang him” and “shoot him” after Booth fled through the backstage to a horse waiting outside. 

He saw a distraught Mary Todd Lincoln and heard her screams as men hoisted water and spirits to the box to be given to the dying president.

It was a couple of days before newspapers printed the name and photo of the assassin. But Spencer Bronson, a regular theatergoer, knew immediately who killed Lincoln.

He wrote his sister: "I will also send you a paper with the full account of the affair & also a good portrait of the murderer who I am shure is J. Wilkes Booth who I have seen before… the city is mad with excitement at the act. Three men have been shot dead by soldiers for saying they were glad the president was dead. Thus far the murderer has not been caught."

The Wisconsin Veterans Museum in Madison recently purchased at auction the original photo of Bronson, dressed in his uniform dating from around 1865 — the only known photo of him from the war.

The museum has acquired thousands of Civil War photos of Wisconsin soldiers and regularly seeks to add to its collection of original images.

http://www.jsonline.com/news/wisconsin/museum-buys-photo-of-civil-war-soldier-who-saw-lincoln-assassinated-b99240263z1-255082211.html

From: The Civil War Parlor, on Tumblr

I am shure is J. Wilkes Booth who I have seen before… the city is mad with excitement at the act. Three men have been shot dead by soldiers for saying they were glad the president was dead. Thus far the murderer has not been caught."

The Wisconsin Veterans Museum in Madison recently purchased at auction the original photo of Bronson, dressed in his uniform dating from around 1865 — the only known photo of him from the war.

The museum has acquired thousands of Civil War photos of Wisconsin soldiers and regularly seeks to add to its collection of original images.

http://www.jsonline.com/news/wisconsin/museum-buys-photo-of-civil-war-soldier-who-saw-lincoln-assassinated-b99240263z1-255082211.html

From: The Civil War Parlor, on Tumblr

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