This week in the Civil War for October 13 1863
Emma Kline - spy

Hawaii Sons Of The Civil War

 

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Forgotten History- Hawaii Sons Of The Civil War - 119 Soldiers From Hawaii Participated In The Conflict, Many In The Union Army And Some In The Confederate Navy~ 
Many Hawaiians Served Under Different Names That Were Easier To Pronounce

When the first shot of the American Civil War was fired at Fort Sumter off the coast of South Carolina, nearly six thousand miles away, the Kingdom of Hawaii was a sovereign, developing nation. Hawaii’s close relationship economically, diplomatically, and socially with the United States ensured that the wake of the American Civil War reached the Hawaiian Islands. Diplomatic decisions were required and domestic politics took a major turn. Hawaiian property and citizens became casualties of war, sugar began its rise as the economic king, and hundreds of people from Hawaii and elsewhere in the Pacific world served in the Armies and Navies of the Union and Confederacy.

Henry Ho‘olulu Pitman was the son of High Chiefess Kino‘ole-o-Liliha of Hilo and Benjamin Pitman, originally from Boston.  Pitman mustered into the Union Army as a private in 1862.  He was captured near Fredericksburg, Virginia and sent to Libby Prison then Camp Parole where he died of an illness in 1863.  He was only 17 years of age.

Allan Brinsmade was raised in Koloa, Kaua‘i and enlisted as a private in the Confederate Army in 1861.  He fought at the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863 and was discharged later the same year as a 2nd lieutenant.  He temporarily served as Captain and may have lost a hand during the war.

http://worldhistoryconnected.press.illinois.edu/9.3/vance.html

Documentary: Fund Raiser For Sons Of The Civil War 

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/hawaii-sons-of-the-civil-war-a-documentary-film

http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/23490890/hawaii-and-the-civil-war

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