St. Louis County Civil War Sympsoium
WARNER BROS. REMOVING CONFEDERATE FLAG FROM ‘DUKES OF HAZZARD’ CAR

This week in the Civil War - August 26, 1862

Second battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29 1862, Currier and Ives-600
Confederate Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson orders his forces to attack the Union army on the Warrenton Turnpike in Northern Virginia on Aug. 28, 1862, opening the Second Battle of Bull Run, or Manassas. Furious fighting rages for hours at the Brawner Farm, not far from the site of the First Battle of Manassas or Bull Run.

Union Maj. Gen. John Pope is certain he has trapped Jackson and sends a large federal force to attack Confederates on the farm, set on a ridge. The opening day of battle reaches a thundering crescendo in a 90-minute firefight between rival infantry lines set about 80 yards apart. Sunset brings a pause as the first day's fighting abates. Then, on Aug. 29, 1862, Pope initiates a series of assaults against Jackson's lines along an unfinished railroad route. Heavy casualties arise as the attacks are rebuffed on the second day of fighting.

On the third day, Aug. 30, Pope renews his attacks, apparently unaware that the Confederates have been heavily reinforced. Confederate artillery shreds yet another Union assault and a large fighting force of Confederates totaling 28,000 fiercely counterattack. The Confederate onslaught smashes one of the Union flanks and the federal army is driven back. Pope's army, despite an effective rearguard action, is forced to retreat to Centreville as Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee scores a decisive victory. I

n July 1861, the rival armies battled for the first time in the countryside overlooking Bull Run and a Union defeat made clear the war would be long and bloody. Now the Confederate triumph at Second Bull Run shows Lee at the height of his powers. And when the battle is over, casualties on the Union side approach 14,000 while the Confederates report more than 8,000 killed, missing or wounded.

From the Associated Press and ABCNewsGo.com

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