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October 2011

Fremont man explores link to Civil War ancestor

Civil War veteran Andrew Kline's former home at 2916 Sandusky County Road 174 in Rice Township has already been partially dismantled. The center portion of the home was built with timbers in the 1800s and additions on either side were added later.

Civil War veteran Andrew Kline's former home at 2916 Sandusky County Road 174 in Rice Township has already been partially dismantled. The center portion of the home was built with timbers in the 1800s and additions on either side were added later. / Mark Tower/News-Messenger

Mark Tower

RICE TOWNSHIP, OHIO -- North of Fremont, in an area of sprawling farmland and sparse residential development, it's easy to imagine life as one of Fremont's earliest pioneers.

One historic log home at 2916 Sandusky County Road 174, purchased by Civil War veteran Andrew Kline in 1852 and owned by the Kline family for half a century, stands as a testament to the determination of the region's early settlers -- though it may not for long.

The house, no longer owned by the family, likely will be torn down after local firefighters use the home for a training session Saturday.

As Don and Paula Stansberry sit in their Sandusky Township home, poring over 150-year-old photographs and newspaper clippings, their commitment to preserving their collective family history is obvious.

"I want to know my family history," Don Stansberry said. "That's all I want to do, is know."

Continue reading "Fremont man explores link to Civil War ancestor" »


Vandals Represent P.C. Double Standard

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The following story was submitted by a user of semissourian.com. 

Wednesday, October 12, 2011
User-submitted story by Clint E. Lacy

 The Tuesady, October 11, 2011 Southeast Missourian at the following URL

 http://www.semissourian.com/story/177254...

carried a story about Cape Girardeau's Confederate monument being vandalized. In it Scott House stated, "The war has been over for almost 150 years. People should get over their hate issues on whatever side they have. It's hard to tell why somebody would do something like that."

Mr. House and I happen to be in disagreement on many issues concerning the Civil War, this might just be the one thing he and I agree on.

The article also quoted Cape Girardeau County public works director Don McQuay who stated, "I don't understand why somebody would want to tear up public property. It's their property. They're destroying their own property."

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Civil War Confederate shrine at Cape Girardeau courthouse vandalized

 

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Cape Girardeau County public works director Don McQuay makes a phone call to Liley Monument Works Tuesday morning after vandals spray painted graffiti on the Civil War monument in the courtyard of the Common Pleas Courthouse in Cape Girardeau. The removal of the graffiti will cost between four and six hundred dollars. (Laura Simon)

By Scott Moyers ~ Southeast Missourian

A Civil War monument on the grounds of the Common Pleas Courthouse in Cape Girardeau was struck by vandals who spray-painted both sides of the shrine with apparent pro-Union sentiments, nearly 150 years after the last shot was fired.

A two-man crew scrubbed black paint off the monument Tuesday morning. The men, from Marble Hill, Mo.-based Liley Monuments, said they hoped it would be graffiti-free by Tuesday afternoon.

But the message could still be read early Tuesday afternoon. "Go south" was written on the front of the shrine that sits along Lorimier Street near the fountain. That apparently was a request that the marker be moved, not a pro-South message. "We are in the union," read the words on the back. "Obscene. Remove to [illegible] cemetary (sic) in the south."

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Investigating that controversial civil war photo

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Controversial 1861 tintype photo of Andrew Chandler (L) and Silas Chandler (R). Did Silas fight for the Confederacy? Courtesy of Chandler Battaile via PBS.

By GREG BRAXTON

Los Angeles Times

The image on the Civil War tintype is at once both simple and striking: Two armed men in Confederate uniforms pose unsmilingly side by side, so close their legs touch.

But a closer look reveals something more startling. One of the soldiers is African American. The photograph reignites a long-standing historical debate: Did African Americans take up the Confederate cause, which defined them as slaves?

That question is at the center of Tuesday's episode of PBS' "History Detectives," which investigates the tintype and the identity of the two soldiers - Andrew Chandler, who was white, and Silas Chandler, who was black.

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Civil War’s field hospitals ‘frightful’

By Beverly Sayles for Auburnpub.com

James Dana Benton, from the north end of Cayuga County, was an assistant surgeon in the Civil War serving from the summer of 1862 to the end of the war in 1865. The new book “A Surgeon’s Tale: The Civil War Letters of Surgeon James D. Benton,” edited by Christopher E. Loperfido, describes Benton’s life and service as a surgeon with Cayuga County’s own 111th and 98th New York infantries. The Benton family originally moved west to the town of Ira from New England in the early 1800s.

On a recent annual trip to Gettysburg sponsored by the Auburn/Cayuga Community College Alumni Association, I learned much about the 27,000 Union casualties of the Gettysburg battle and how they were cared for.

Hospitals were crude, doctors and surgeons were few, and women were called upon to help with the wounded. Clara Barton, Amelia Hancock and Dorothea Dix were among those who began their healing here.

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Story of sisters' role in Civil War 'under-told,' archivist says

A nun cares for a wounded soldier in this detail from a larger Civil War-era print featuring the field ministry of Holy Cross Father P.P. Cooney. In Civil War battles, at least 300 Daughters of Charity ministered to soldiers on both sides of the war. (CNS photo/courtesy University Archives, The Catholic University of America)

By Carol Zimmermann

EMMITSBURG, Md. (CNS) -- In the final days of June 1863, the Civil War came perilously close to home for the Daughters of Charity in Emmitsburg.
Days before the Battle of Gettysburg, the acres of their farmland property at the foothills of the Catoctin Mountains were used as a camp for tens of thousands of Union soldiers while their generals stayed in the former home of the order's founder, St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, and planned battle strategies.

The troops moved on to fight one of the bloodiest Civil War battles just 15 miles away from the sisters, and when the fighting ended, leaving tens of thousands dead and wounded, the Daughters of Charity were among the first civilians to arrive and care for Union and Confederate soldiers.
The sisters provided food, water, bandages and basic medical care. They also gave spiritual solace to soldiers who requested it: praying with them, distributing religious medals, baptizing the dying and writing letters home to soldiers' families.

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CIVIL WAR TRUST PROVIDES HISTORY LOVERS WITH “ESSENTIAL TO DO LIST” FOR 150TH ANNIVERSARY


CWT-CW150-bookWashington, D.C. – Whether it’s standing atop Chattanooga’s Lookout Mountain or inside Antietam’s Dunker Church, or viewing the remains of the ironclad USS Monitor or the Confederate submarine HL Hunley, some experiences have the power to bring history alive like nothing else can.

Believing there is no substitute for experiencing the places and situations that made history, the Civil War Trust, the nation’s largest battlefield preservation organization, is marking the sesquicentennial anniversary of the American Civil War with the release of an exciting new book designed to bring the past alive for students of history in dynamic new ways.

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East Tennessean builds Civil War gun carriages, caissons for living

Burroughs Battery members Justin Bubrowski, left, Gary Howard, Steve Cameron and Brandon Bragg practice Tuesday with a howitzer built by Trail Rock Ordnance in Blaine. The mounted artillery battery is rehearsing for the Battle of Fort Sanders re-enactment today and Sunday at the Clapp Farm on Washington Pike. (ADAM BRIMER/NEWS SENTINEL)

PHOTO BY ADAM BRIMER, COPYRIGHT © 2011 // BUY THIS PHOTO

Burroughs Battery members Justin Bubrowski, left, Gary Howard, Steve Cameron and Brandon Bragg practice Tuesday with a howitzer built by Trail Rock Ordnance in Blaine. The mounted artillery battery is rehearsing for the Battle of Fort Sanders re-enactment today and Sunday at the Clapp Farm on Washington Pike. (ADAM BRIMER/NEWS SENTINEL)

By Fred Brown
Friday, October 7, 2011

BLAINE — The scene is right out of 1861 — restless horses, rumbling caissons and ground-rattling blasts from a 1,300-pound cannon belching fire and smoke.

Steve Cameron, captain of the Burroughs Battery, and his outfit are practicing on Buford Watson's farm in Blaine, preparing for this weekend's Battle of Fort Sanders, which will be re-enacted on the Smiley Clapp Farm on Washington Pike.

Cameron, 41, isn't your ordinary weekend-warrior commander of an artillery battery for Civil War re-enactments. He makes his living building exact replicas of Civil War-era gun carriages, limbers and caissons.

Even the cannons he has manufactured to his specifications in a Morristown foundry are exact copies of the originals.

After attending re-enactments in 2000, Cameron, a former U.S. Army ordnance officer (1992-96), enjoyed reliving battle scenes with big guns more than playing the role of an infantryman.

"I had to have a cannon," he says with a laugh.

So he decided to build a cannon and create his own mounted artillery battery.

Continue reading "East Tennessean builds Civil War gun carriages, caissons for living" »


Civil War changed Americans' view of Providence, historian says

 

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By Ken Camp, Managing Editor   
The Baptist Standard

Published: October 06, 2011

WACO—Americans in 1860s viewed the Civil War through the lens of God at work in human affairs—a lens left shattered by that bloody conflict, according to historian George Rable.

Rable, the Charles Summersell Chair in southern history at the University of Alabama and author of God's Almost Chosen Peoples, spoke at a symposium on the Civil War and religion sponsored by Baylor University's Institute for the Studies of Religion.

"As Abraham Lincoln stated in his second inaugural address on March 4, 1865, both sides prayed to the same God and read the same Bible. Indeed, religious language, imagery and ideas were pervasive during the Civil War era," Rable said.

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