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October 2011

Oldest Civil War veteran to die in Wayne County Indiana was a Confederate

Between 750,000 and 1 million men fought for the South, including the oldest Civil War veteran to die in Wayne County, Henderson H. Lilly. He, like these unnamed veterans in the picture, was one of many who survived to old age.

Between 750,000 and 1 million men fought for the South, including the oldest Civil War veteran to die in Wayne County, Henderson H. Lilly. He, like these unnamed veterans in the picture, was one of many who survived to old age. / Supplied file photo

The true accounts you are about to read are from newspapers and diaries and regimental histories, and from the "Directory & Soldier's Registry of Wayne County, Indiana," published in 1865.

Read about the oldest Civil War veteran to die in Wayne County -- a Confederate; an underage Perry Township 14-year-old who fought in the Iron Brigade without pay; a Cambridge City youth who sacrificed his life while bearing the National Colors; and President-Elect Abraham Lincoln's comments about Richmond to a handful of local musicians.

The oldest veteran to die in Wayne County was a Confederate soldier. Henderson H. Lilly was 101 when he died in East Germantown on Oct. 10, 1940. He was the oldest -- and last -- Civil War veteran to die in Wayne County.

Continue reading "Oldest Civil War veteran to die in Wayne County Indiana was a Confederate" »


Mr Lincoln's High-Tech War

Mr Lincolns High Tech WarThomas B. Allen’s expertise in military history and strategy is combined with Roger MacBride Allen’s knowledge of technology to reveal a lesser-known yet fascinating side of the 16th president of the United States. Their authoritative narrative reveals Lincoln as our nation’s first hands-on Commander-in-Chief, whose appreciation for the power of technology plays a critical role in the North’s Civil War victory over the less developed South.

Readers meet Lincoln as he exchanges vital telegraph messages with his generals in the field; we witness his inspection of new ship models at the Navy Yard; we view the president target-shooting with the designer of a new kind of rifle; and we follow Lincoln, the man of action, as he leads a daring raid to recapture Norfolk, VA.

National Geographic Children's Books (January 13, 2009)


Civil War Recruitment Posters


Collection of the New-York Historical Society,
Brian Resnick The Atlantic

One hundred fifty years ago, the Civil War began and the fighting was brutal. Nearly 620,000 Union and Confederate soldiers lost their lives -- more Americans than in both World Wars combined. The armies needed men to refill rapidly declining ranks and used recruitment advertisements such as these as a means to find them. Like the posters in later wars, the propaganda in this gallery (mostly Union, as Confederate posters are rare) used patriotic effigies such as Lady Liberty to entice recruits. But in contrast with the inspiring messages from the 20th century, the text of these posters is much more blunt. The sentiment "Don't wait to be drafted" fills a line on almost every flyer. Those who enlisted received a bounty for their troubles, sometimes totaling several hundred dollars. Those who did not faced possible conscription. This, of course, led to the occupation of bounty jumping, in which men would sign up, collect the cash, desert the army, and repeat the process. Congress later outlawed bounties in 1917 with the Selective Service Act.

Continue reading "Civil War Recruitment Posters" »


Bats, Balls and Bullets

By GEORGE B. KIRSCH

Union prisoners playing ball at Salisbury, N.C., ca. 1863
Library of Congress - Union prisoners playing ball at Salisbury, N.C., ca. 1863.

In late March and early April 1861, ballplayers in dozens of American towns looked forward to another season of play. But they were not highly paid professionals whose teams traveled to Florida or Arizona for spring training. Rather, they were amateur members of private organizations founded by men whose social standing ranged from the working class through the upper-middle ranks of society. There were no formal leagues or fixed schedules of games, although there were regional associations of clubs that drew up and enforced rules for each type of bat and ball game. Contests between the best teams attracted large crowds (including many gamblers), and reporters from daily newspapers and weekly sporting magazines wrote detailed accounts of the games.

The English national game of cricket was the first modern team sport in the United States. During the 1850s, an estimated 10,000 English immigrants and native-born men and boys founded about 500 clubs in at least 22 states in the Union. By 1861, Philadelphia had become the cricketing capital of the nation, boasting the most organizations and the largest contingent of proficient, American-born players. But cricket also faced major challenges from two upstart versions of baseball that had recently exploded in popularity. “The Massachusetts game” reigned supreme in Boston and most of New England, while “the New York game” ruled Manhattan, Brooklyn and New Jersey.

Continue reading "Bats, Balls and Bullets" »


150 years ago, a primitive Internet united the USA

ADVANCE FOR USE MONDAY, OCT. 24, 2011 AND THEREAFTER - This circa 1863 photo provided by the U.S. Library of Congress shows a repairman working on a telegraph line in the United States. One hundred fifty years ago, as the nation was being ripped apart by Civil War, it was being knitted together electronically by what was arguably the world's first high-tech gadget, the humble telegraph. On Oct. 24, 1861, with just the push of a button Stephen J. Field would send a message from a telegraph office in San Francisco to President Abraham Lincoln in Washington, telling him the first transcontinental telegraph line was up and running. (AP Photo/Library of Congress)

This circa 1863 photo provided by the U.S. Library of Congress shows a repairman working on a telegraph line in the United States. One hundred fifty years ago, as the nation was being ripped apart by Civil War, it was being knitted together electronically by what was arguably the world's first high-tech gadget, the humble telegraph. On Oct. 24, 1861, with just the push of a button Stephen J. Field would send a message from a telegraph office in San Francisco to President Abraham Lincoln in Washington, telling him the first transcontinental telegraph line was up and running. (AP Photo/Library of Congress) 

(AP)  LOS ANGELES — Long before there was an Internet or an iPad, before people were social networking and instant messaging, Americans had already gotten wired.

Monday marks the 150th anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental telegraph. From sea to sea, it electronically knitted together a nation that was simultaneously tearing itself apart, North and South, in the Civil War.

Americans soon saw that a breakthrough in the spread of technology could enhance national identity and, just as today, that it could vastly change lives.
"It was huge," says Amy Fischer, archivist for Western Union, which strung the line across mountains, canyons and tribal lands to make the final connection. "... With the Civil War just a few months old, the idea that California, the growing cities of California, could talk to Washington and the East Coast in real time was huge. It's hard to overstate the impact of that."

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Civil War's twilight battle re-enactment in Fresno

 

A woman in period dress walks through the fog on the battlefield at dusk, calling out in earnest searching for a loved one during this year's annual The Civil War Revisited, held at Kearney Park Saturday, October 22, 2011 in Fresno, CA. The two-day event concludes Sunday and marks the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the war according to organizers. This was the first year the Widow's Walk was held and followed the Twilight Battle reenactment of the Battle of Bull Run, or First Manassas as it was known in the Confederacy.– ERIC PAUL ZAMORA/THE FRESNO BEE

Read more at the Fresnobee


Wilson's Creek revisited

By: Jo Ann Hustis - jhustis@morrisdailyherald.com

More than the usual amount of cavalry, with some even engaging in sword fights while on horseback, participated in the Civil War re-enactment at Dollinger Family Farm in Channahon this weekend.

CHANNAHON — A thousand observers watched as 700 re-enactors and $1 million in equipment, weapons, and uniforms took to the Civil War "battlefield" Saturday at Dollinger Family Farm.

Many observers noted afterward the re-enactment was the best they had seen in years of attending the annual event.

"In the 15 years I've been here, this was one of the finest and best choreographed battles I've ever seen," Kevin Lonergan of Bettendorf, Iowa, said.
"They also did a wonderful job in honoring Gen. Dellinger."

The Wilson's Creek foray was the first major Civil War battle fought west of the Mississippi River, and was where Nathaniel Lyon became the first Union general killed in combat. Although the Confederate troops were victorious, the South failed to capitalize on the win.

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Women descended from Civil War Union soldiers form area chapter

UDAR_1
Rick Wood
Kelly Underwood-Dzemske, seated outside the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers on the Veterans Affairs grounds, holds a photo of her great-grandfather Seymour Ellicson along with a document issued for his release in a prisoner swap. Ellicson was a member of Co. B, 8th Wisconsin Infantry who was captured by Confederate forces in Mississippi in September 1862.

Aaron Stockholm was lucky.


Thousands of men in blue and gray were wounded and killed on the hellish battlefields in the small Pennsylvania town of Gettysburg, but Aaron Stockholm was not one of them.

Somehow the bullets and cannon shot missed him. Not only did he survive, so did his brothers John and George and his brother-in-law Jacob Palmer. All four men endured Gettysburg and other Civil War battles, returned home, married, fathered families and lived to old age.

Their children had children and so did those children until, 150 years later, Aaron Stockholm's third great-granddaughter, Laurel Kennedy, proud of her ancestor's military service, decided to join a newly formed chapter of Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War.

"All four of them were in two major battles and they all went home together and survived, which is very unusual," said Kennedy, an occupational therapy student who lives in Milwaukee.

Continue reading "Women descended from Civil War Union soldiers form area chapter" »


Army museum's morbid oddities resettled in Md.

By DAVID DISHNEAU, Associated Press 

Lincol_bullet

This undated handout photo provided by the National Museum of Health and Medicine shows the bullet that killed President Abraham Lincoln on April 15, 1865, and is among the items on display at the National Museum of Health and Medicine in Silver Spring, Md. 

 

 

 

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — The bullet that killed Abraham Lincoln is mounted under glass, like a diamond in a snow globe, in its new home at the National Museum of Health and Medicine.

The lead ball and several skull fragments from the 16th president are in a tall, antique case overlooking a Civil War exhibit in a museum gallery in Silver Spring, just off the Capital Beltway.

Continue reading "Army museum's morbid oddities resettled in Md." »