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September 2011

Lost Confederate Weapons and Uniforms in a Secret Attic

Tim King: Salem-News.com Editor and Writer

A story left by my grandfather before his death in 1968.

The story is intriguing: could a house that contained a hidden attic with Confederate weapons and uniforms still exist?

The story is intriguing: could a house that contained a hidden attic with Confederate weapons and uniforms still exist in a rural section of Arkansas?

(SALEM, Ore.) - I've stumbled upon the most fascinating information about the discovery of Confederate weapons and uniforms in an abandoned Arkansas house in 1890.

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Researching Your Civil War Ancestry

Use online resources to learn if your family had roots on the Union or Confederate side

by: Kathleen Brandt | from: AARP | April 11, 2011

Discovering Civil War Ancestors

If your family was living in the United States in the 1860s, chances are good that you're related to someone who served in the Civil War.

Perhaps your great- or great-great-grandfather was among the 2.1 million men mustered in the Union Army or the 800,000 to 900,000 men who were on the Confederate side. Or maybe a great-aunt served as a scout, nurse or spy. She may even have been among the several hundred females who, disguised as men, actually fought on the ground.

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September 1861: Settling in for a Long War

During this month, the civil war expands to Kentucky and West Virginia, and President Lincoln rejects an attempt at emancipation

  • By David Zax
  • Smithsonian magazine, September 2011

Defence of LexingtonUnion generals lost a week long siege of Lexington, Missouri, shown here, but took control of Ship Island, off Mississippi's coast.

Northern Illinois University Libraries

Five months into the Civil War—on September 9—Richmond, Virginia’s Daily Dispatch editorialized that the time for debate had passed. “Words are now of no avail: blood is more potent than rhetoric, more profound than logic.” Six days earlier, Confederate forces had invaded Kentucky, drawing that state into the war on the Union side and firming up the border between North and South.

But who to trust in the border states? “We have had no success lately, and never can have success, while the enemy know all our plans and dispositions,” wrote Confederate war clerk John Beauchamp Jones on September 24 from Richmond. “Their spies and emissaries here are so many torch-bearers for them.” In Washington, President Lincoln confronted disloyalty even to his north; between the 12th and 17th, he ordered troops in Maryland to arrest 30 secessionists, including members of the state legislature.

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Civil War News (1962) Trading Card Set

Civil War News
5¢ Wax Pack

Civil War News is a 1962 collector card series from Topps, containing hand-painted scenes of different battles and historical events of the American Civil War. Each card depicted graphic, bloody and extremely realistic images painted by famous pulp artist Norm Saunders. The front of each card has a caption in a white box set inside the picture area. The backs are gray with a red-brown border; the card number is located on the border at the bottom corner at the right-hand side. Inside each wax pack was a folded facsimile banknote, for a total of seventeen different bills.

Civil War bubblegum cards (that's what the set was actually called) became known by collectors as The Civil War News. This was the result of the card backs, which chronicled each civil war event via a newspaper journal format, using a generic banner called CIVIL WAR NEWS. It was never meant to be the name of the card series, but collectors have certainly picked up on that.

Title: Civil War
Type: Cards sold via 5¢ wax packs
Design: Color hand-painted images
Verso: Gray with a red-brown border
Genre: Historical
Producer: Topps
Year released: 1962
Cards in set: 88
Wrapper produced: Yes
Chase Items: 17 Confederate banknotes

Old Bubblegum Cards


US Civil War Comes Alive 150 Years After First Battle

More than 6,500 people take part in Manassas re-enactment

Susan Logue | Manassas, Virginia

The Manassas battle, staged twice during a recent weekend, is the first of several big reenactments planned to mark the 150th anniversary of the American Civil War.

Photo: VOA - S. Logue

The Manassas battle, staged twice during a recent weekend, is the first of several big reenactments planned to mark the 150th anniversary of the American Civil War.

A century and a half after the first major battle of the U.S. Civil War, thousands of soldiers in 19th century uniforms once again faced each other across a field in Manassas, Virginia, 50 kilometers south of Washington.

Not even extreme heat was enough to keep the re-enactors from recreating a pivotal point in American history.

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Richmond Re-examines its Confederate Past

Voice of America

August 23, 2011

Richmond Re-examines its Confederate Past

Southern capital of the confederacy marks Civil War anniversary

Susan Logue | Richmond, Virginia

Leaders of the Confederacy are memorialized in monuments dominating one of Richmond, Virginia's main boulevards.

Photo: VOA - A. Greenbaum

Leaders of the Confederacy are memorialized in monuments dominating one of Richmond, Virginia's main boulevards.

As the United States marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War, many Americans are re-examining the conflict, especially in Richmond, Virginia, former capital of the Confederacy.
During the Civil War, which lasted four years, the nation was divided. Eleven states in the southern portion of the country seceded to form a new nation, the Confederate States of America. Determined to preserve the union, President Abraham Lincoln went to war against the rebel states and, ultimately, abolished slavery.   
Before the war, Richmond was the capital of Virginia and one of the biggest cities in the south. It was the obvious choice for the capital of the new government, according to S. Waite Rawls III, president of the Museum of the Confederacy.

“Virginia was the most important state in the Confederacy, biggest population, most culture, and also the most industrial of the states in the south.”

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Battle Lines, Slavery Divide D.C. Man’s Civil War Ancestry

Battle Lines, Slavery Divide D.C. Man’s Civil War Ancestry
Posted Saturday, August 13, 2011 :: Staff infoZine

  Jackson

Lee Jackson, 60, is a descendent of both a white Confederate and a black Union soldier. He has been researching their participation in the Civil War. SHFWire photo by Rebecca Koenig

By Rebecca Koenig - When he was a ninth grader in Natchez, Miss., Lee Jackson’s American history textbook did not mention slavery.

Washington, D.C. - infoZine - Scripps Howard Foundation Wire - The Civil War, it explained, was caused by a Northern misunderstanding of the Southern way of life. It certainly did not reference the 200,000 African Americans, many of them former slaves, who fought for the Union during the conflict that began 150 years ago. 

It wasn’t until after Jackson, 60, moved away from Mississippi to become a lawyer in Washington that he started talking to his grandmother about his family history and learned that his great-great-grandfather, Buck Murphy, was one of those black Union soldiers. She also told him his great-great-great-grandfather, Jack Murphy, was a white slave owner and Confederate soldier – and Buck’s master. 

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