Web/Tech Feed

Free phone app provides St. Louis Civil War highlights.

 

 

BY JOE HOLLEMAN • jholleman@post-dispatch.com

Anyone who has toured the historic Civil War battlefield at Gettysburg understands how useful an audio guide can be.

Now, St. Louisans can download a free phone app that provides information about local events and locations tied to the conflict, said Angie Dietz, a spokesperson for the Missouri History Museum.

Based on the book "The Civil War in St. Louis" by William C. Winter, the app allows the user to:

• Pinpoint location of important Civil War related sites in the St. Louis area.

• Use a GPS-enabled map to find historic places, and also follow recommended tour routes based on the user’s location.

• Explore a "pinch-and-zoom" photo gallery.

• Listen to a narrator explain historic locations connected to the Civil War and relate background stories about those events.

The app currently is compatible with Android, iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. To obtain the app — which is free — folks can visit the iTunes store or visit the Google Play store on Android and search for "Missouri History Museum."

Joe Holleman's "Life Sherpa" column appears every Sunday in Everyday. Follow him on Facebook and Twitter.

From Stltoday.com


150 years ago, a primitive Internet united the USA

ADVANCE FOR USE MONDAY, OCT. 24, 2011 AND THEREAFTER - This circa 1863 photo provided by the U.S. Library of Congress shows a repairman working on a telegraph line in the United States. One hundred fifty years ago, as the nation was being ripped apart by Civil War, it was being knitted together electronically by what was arguably the world's first high-tech gadget, the humble telegraph. On Oct. 24, 1861, with just the push of a button Stephen J. Field would send a message from a telegraph office in San Francisco to President Abraham Lincoln in Washington, telling him the first transcontinental telegraph line was up and running. (AP Photo/Library of Congress)

This circa 1863 photo provided by the U.S. Library of Congress shows a repairman working on a telegraph line in the United States. One hundred fifty years ago, as the nation was being ripped apart by Civil War, it was being knitted together electronically by what was arguably the world's first high-tech gadget, the humble telegraph. On Oct. 24, 1861, with just the push of a button Stephen J. Field would send a message from a telegraph office in San Francisco to President Abraham Lincoln in Washington, telling him the first transcontinental telegraph line was up and running. (AP Photo/Library of Congress) 

(AP)  LOS ANGELES — Long before there was an Internet or an iPad, before people were social networking and instant messaging, Americans had already gotten wired.

Monday marks the 150th anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental telegraph. From sea to sea, it electronically knitted together a nation that was simultaneously tearing itself apart, North and South, in the Civil War.

Americans soon saw that a breakthrough in the spread of technology could enhance national identity and, just as today, that it could vastly change lives.
"It was huge," says Amy Fischer, archivist for Western Union, which strung the line across mountains, canyons and tribal lands to make the final connection. "... With the Civil War just a few months old, the idea that California, the growing cities of California, could talk to Washington and the East Coast in real time was huge. It's hard to overstate the impact of that."

Continue reading "150 years ago, a primitive Internet united the USA" »