Battlefield Medicine Feed

A fallen soldier

Tumblr_nk356pygBm1rs5g28o1_540A Fallen Soldier

"This skull belonged to a soldier of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteers, an African-American unit that took part in a July 1863 assault on Fort Wagner in Charleston Harbor. The regiment sustained 272 killed, wounded, and missing during the attack.

By examining the skull, researchers determined how this soldier died. The size of the wound and the remains of the projectile indicate that he was killed by an iron canister ball from one of the fort’s two 12-pound field howitzers. The ball entered behind his left ear and traveled upwards through the lower part of the brain.”

(Photo and Caption taken from display at the National Museum of Health and Medicine, Washington DC)

 


Civil War Medicine Chest

 

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Carried By Charles E. White- Seige of Port Hudson 1861 & ‘62D

Diseases contracted during the Civil War killed over twice as many men as bullets. Infections spread rapidly in overcrowded camps. Measles, mumps, rubella, and chicken pox ran rampant, particularly among newly-enlisted soldiers from rural areas who lacked immunities from prior exposure. But even more fatalities resulted from dysentery and diarrhea contracted due to unsanitary conditions.

http://antiquescientifica.com/web.civil_war_medical_box.htm

http://www.ozarkscivilwar.org/themes/medicine

From the Civil War Parlor on Tumblr


Minie Balls: small but lethal

 

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  • Skull
Skull

 

Minie Balls: Small but Lethal

The hollow base of the cone-shaped minie ball (named for French inventor Claude Minié) expanded when the gunpowder ignited, thereby catching its grooves in the interior rifling of the gun and increasing the velocity and accuracy of the bullet. The longer, effective firing range of minie balls also turned mass infantry assaults into mass slaughter until military tactics caught up with the destructive power of the new technology. The ubiquitous minie balls have been collected as battlefield souvenirs ever since.

Information from Library of Congress

Private J. Luman’s Skull…

“Wounded at the battle of Mine Run, Virginia, on November 27th, 1863, when a minie ball passed through his skull. He was treated in the field hospital for several days before being evacuated to the 3rd division hospital in Alexandria. By December 8th, Private Luman was comatose and Surgeon E. Bentley applied a trephine and removed the splinters of bone associated with the wound. His condition failed to improve and he died five days later.”

-The National Museum Of Health And Medicine
Washington, D.C.

From the Civil War Parlor

To Kill and to Heal at the Lincoln Museum

 

To Kill and To Heal:
Weapons and Medicine of the Civil War 

A Civil War Sesquicentennial Exhibition
May 11, 2012 - December 31, 2012 

The deadliest weapon of the Civil War was one that nobody could see, killing two soldiers for every one felled by gunfire. The extraordinary casualties caused by that invisible killer, disease; the conventional weapons used to create slaughter on an unprecedented scale; horrific injuries suffered on the battlefield; and the heroic efforts of medical personnel to treat soldiers on both sides are described in detail in "To Kill and to Heal: Weapons and Medicine of the Civil War," a new exhibit at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum in Springfield. 

Paid admission to the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum is required to view the exhibit. Admission prices are $12 for adults, $9 for senior citizens, and $6 for children. A special admission rate of $5 is available to those who want to visit only the new exhibit.


To Kill and to Heal: new exhibit at the Lincoln Library

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SPRINGFIELD —

The deadliest weapon of the Civil War was one that nobody could see, killing two soldiers for every one felled by gunfire.  The extraordinary casualties caused by that invisible killer, disease; the conventional weapons used to create slaughter on an unprecedented scale; horrific injuries suffered on the battlefield; and the heroic efforts of medical personnel to treat soldiers on both sides are described in detail in “To Kill and to Heal:  Weapons and Medicine of the Civil War,” a new exhibit that opens May 11 at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum in Springfield.

Continue reading "To Kill and to Heal: new exhibit at the Lincoln Library" »


Death in the Civil War a new film by Ric Burns on PBS

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Over half of the soldiers killed during the Civil War were never identified. This changed the American Psyche in many ways, Among the changes we owe to the Civil War are the creation of national cemeteries and the birth of a duty to identify dead soldiers and notify their next of kin.

A new film by Ric Burns, based on a The Republic of Suffering by  Drew Gilpin Faust will premier on PBS on September 18, 2012

The American Expierence


Civil War Day 2012 at Southwestern Illinois College

 

Living History day at Southwestern Illinois College in Belleville Monday, April 30, 2012. Union forces from the 3rd Illinois Cavalry along with members of the Lt. George E. Dixon Camp #1962, Sons of Confederate Veterans gave students a unique opportunity to learn about our heritage.

Civil War surgery

Garry Ladd talks about being the Regimental Surgeon for the 3rd Illinois Volunteer Cavalry Regiment during a Living History day at Southwestern Illinois College in Belleville Monday. Ladd spoke about the medicine and surgical training a Civil War doctor had during that time period. Ladd made the point that most of the training was done on the job and that the transfer of disease and infection was not a concern or known about during that time period.(caption by Derik Holtmann/BND)

Union forces from the 3rd Illinois Cavalry along with members of the Lt. George E. Dixon Camp #1962, Sons of Confederate Veterans gave students a unique opportunity to learn about our heritage. 

 


Five medical innovations of the Civil War

Last year marked the 150th anniversary of the first gunshots of the Civil War -and the first gunshot wounds. As it turns out, the bloodiest war in American history was also one of the most influential in battlefield medicine. Civil War surgeons learned fast, and many of their MacGyver-like solutions have had lasting impact. Here are some of the advances and the people behind them.

By Chip Rowe,  from the November-December 2011 issue of mental_floss magazine.

Continue reading at Neatorama

 


Civil War’s field hospitals ‘frightful’

By Beverly Sayles for Auburnpub.com

James Dana Benton, from the north end of Cayuga County, was an assistant surgeon in the Civil War serving from the summer of 1862 to the end of the war in 1865. The new book “A Surgeon’s Tale: The Civil War Letters of Surgeon James D. Benton,” edited by Christopher E. Loperfido, describes Benton’s life and service as a surgeon with Cayuga County’s own 111th and 98th New York infantries. The Benton family originally moved west to the town of Ira from New England in the early 1800s.

On a recent annual trip to Gettysburg sponsored by the Auburn/Cayuga Community College Alumni Association, I learned much about the 27,000 Union casualties of the Gettysburg battle and how they were cared for.

Hospitals were crude, doctors and surgeons were few, and women were called upon to help with the wounded. Clara Barton, Amelia Hancock and Dorothea Dix were among those who began their healing here.

Continue reading "Civil War’s field hospitals ‘frightful’" »