Newly Discovered Portraits of Jefferson and Varina Davis

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Quarter-plate tintypes attributed to Jesse H. Whitehurst of Washington, D.C. John O’Brien collection.

In Washington, D.C. on Jan. 21, 1861, Jefferson Davis stood on the floor of the U.S. Senate and bid farewell to his colleagues. Two weeks earlier, his homeland of Mississippi had dissolved its ties with the Union, a move that effectively ended his senatorial career. 

The day proved the saddest of his life. Worn down by attempts to find a compromise to avert the current crisis and weighted down with stress and anxiety, Davis would soon leave the capital bound for an uncertain fate. His wife, Varina, would accompany him, equally distraught to leave their much-loved Washington.

Physical characteristics indicate the portraits were made at the same time. The brass mats and frames are similar, as is the texture of the back of the iron plates. Though the Davises may have visited Whitehurst’s gallery together, their different poses suggests the portraits were not thought of as a pair—Jefferson stares straight ahead and Varina in profile.

 

Read the full article at: https://militaryimages.atavist.com/jefferson-davis-on-the-eve-of-war-spring-2016

 


Battle Flag Of The 26th North Carolina

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Battle Flag Of The 26th North Carolina (The Museum Of The Confederacy)

​"North Carolina cannot remain much longer stationary; she must write her destiny either under the flag of Mr. Lincoln and aid to coerce the south or unite with the south to resist and defend their rights.“ 

William Holland Thomas to his wife, January 1, 1861. John C. Inscoe, The Heart of Confederate Appalachia: Western North Carolina in the Civil War. 

North Carolina seceded from the Union only reluctantly, yet it contributed as much as any state to the Confederate cause in soldiers, money, and supplies. North Carolina was also home to many Unionists, and this civil war at home — on top of the hardships of Union occupation, the deaths of thousands of men, and runaway inflation — tore the state nearly to shreds. 

http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/gettysburg/gettysburg-2011/the-battle-for-herbst-woods.html?referrer=https://www.google.com/

http://thomaslegion.net/

From: thecivilwarparlor


Only Known Photograph Of A Mounted Alabama Confederate

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At the beginning of hostilities, Alabama state troops seized forts at the entrance to Mobile Bay and the Union arsenal at Mount Vernon.  There was no fighting in the state early in the war, but in 1862 invading Federal forces held sizable areas. To resist the invasion, almost every white Alabamian old enough to carry a gun enlisted in the Confederate forces.  Some 2,500 white men and 10,000 blacks had already enlisted in the Union army. 

There are no statistics on Alabama’s contributions to the Confederate army, but estimates vary between 75,000 and 125,000 fighting men from a population of just above 500,000 whites.  Estimates of losses range from 25,000 to 70,000. The state furnished the Confederacy with 60-65 regiments of infantry, 12-15 regiments of cavalry, and over 20 batteries of artillery.

(Source: Historical Times Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Civil War) 

Photo: In case: May 11th 1861″ and “To David / Adams / Montevallo, Ala.”Ambrotype is 3.25 x 4.75 inches File name: Q778; Q779; Q780 -

See more at: http://alabamapioneers.com/alabama-confederate-soldiers-photographs-can-identify/#sthash.SWjjnAXL.dpuf 

From: thecivilwarparlorthecivilwarparlor.tumblr.com


Slavery - not just in the South

SLAVERY -NOT JUST IN THE SOUTH

This 1851 poster warned free blacks in Boston against talking to city police and authorities who were cooperating with slavers

Slaves were part of American history almost from the beginning, and both Northern and Southern businessmen became rich from the slave trade

  • Northern states permitted slavery in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, but outlawed it around the start of the nineteenth century.
  • Even though slavery was not prevalent in the North, northern commercial and industrial centers (particularly textiles industries) had a vested interest in the survival of slavery in the South.

The North failed to develop large-scale agrarian slavery, such as later arose in the Deep South, but that had little to do with morality and much to do with climate and economy.

Slaves that lived in the North were often domestic servants or bondsmen to small farmers and rural iron works. Unlike in the South, Northern farms were not large-scale enterprises that focused on producing one cash crop. They were often smaller, more agriculturally diversified enterprises that required fewer laborers. Hence, the need for enslaved bondsmen gradually dwindled–especially as rapid soil depletion and the growth of industry in northern cities attracted many rural northerners to wage labor cities.

Advent of the cotton gin, which supplied the North with the surplus of raw cotton necessary to produce finished goods for export. Northern industry and commerce relied on Southern cash crop production and therefore, while slavery was actively abolished in the North, most northerners were content to allow slavery to flourish in the Southern states until conflicts over the admission of slave states into the union in the mid-nineteenth century incited northern opposition to the expansion of Southern slavery.

Source: Boundless. “Slavery in the North.” Boundless U.S. History. 

http://slavenorth.com/

From: thecivilwarparlorthecivilwarparlor.tumblr.com


Lincoln Anticipated His Assassination

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It Is Widely Believed That Lincoln Anticipated His Assassination- 

The probe used by Dr. Barnes to locate the ball and the fragments of Lincoln’s skull removed at autopsy. Part of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP)

According to Ward Hill Lamon, Lincoln’s friend and biographer, three days before his assassination Lincoln discussed with Lamon and others a dream he had, saying:

“About ten days ago, I retired very late. I had been up waiting for important dispatches from the front. I could not have been long in bed when I fell into a slumber, for I was weary. I soon began to dream. There seemed to be a death-like stillness about me. Then I heard subdued sobs, as if a number of people were weeping. I thought I left my bed and wandered downstairs. There the silence was broken by the same pitiful sobbing, but the mourners were invisible. I went from room to room; no living person was in sight, but the same mournful sounds of distress met me as I passed along. I saw light in all the rooms; every object was familiar to me; but where were all the people who were grieving as if their hearts would break? I was puzzled and alarmed. What could be the meaning of all this? Determined to find the cause of a state of things so mysterious and so shocking, I kept on until I arrived at the East Room, which I entered. There I met with a sickening surprise. Before me was a catafalque, on which rested a corpse wrapped in funeral vestments. Around it were stationed soldiers who were acting as guards; and there was a throng of people, gazing mournfully upon the corpse, whose face was covered, others weeping pitifully. ‘Who is dead in the White House?’ I demanded of one of the soldiers, 'The President,’ was his answer; 'he was killed by an assassin.’ Then came a loud burst of grief from the crowd, which woke me from my dream. I slept no more that night; and although it was only a dream, I have been strangely annoyed by it ever since.”

On the day of the assassination, Lincoln had told his bodyguard, William H. Crook, that he had been having dreams of himself being assassinated for three straight nights. Crook advised Lincoln not to go that night to Ford’s Theatre, but Lincoln said he had promised his wife they would go. As Lincoln left for the theater, he turned to Crook and said, “Goodbye, Crook.” According to Crook, this was the first time he said that. Before, Lincoln had always said, “Good night, Crook.” Crook later recalled: “It was the first time that he neglected to say 'Good Night’ to me and it was the only time that he ever said 'Good-bye’. I thought of it at that moment and, a few hours later, when the news flashed over Washington that he had been shot, his last words were so burned into my being that they can never be forgotten.”

After Lincoln was shot, Mary was quoted as saying, “His dream was prophetic.”


The Civil War Parlor


Appomattox, April 10, 1865

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151 years ago, on April 10, 1865, Lee and Grant meet for a second time at Appomattox.

On this knoll, Lee and Grant held the second of their two meetings at Appomattox Court House. They met here on the morning of April 10. Grant hoped to enlist Lee’s support in urging the surrender of other Confederate armies, and Lee was intent on working out the final details of surrender.

Lee refused Grant’s request to exert his influence with other armies. But the two officers did resolve details of the surrender. Grant agreed to provide the Confederates with individual parole passes to safeguard their journey home. He would also allow surrendered soldiers to pass free on all government transportation on their way home.

During their two meetings at Appomattox, not a harsh word passed between Lee and Grant. Wrote one Confederate: “General Grant and his men treated us nobly, more nobly than was ever a conquered army treated before of since.” The process of reconciliation had already begun.

From Civil WarScapes on Face Book


Fort De Chartres Flintlocks

 

Les Coureurs des Bois show off thier muzzleloading rifles and other 18/19th Cenurty weapons.

Although they are primarly French and Indian War enthusiasts they did hava a selection of Civil War weapons on display.

Les Coureurs des Bois de Fort de Chartres, Illinois, is a flintlock only muzzle loading gun club that meets at and supports the Fort de Chartres State Historic Site through support of special events and interpretation. Les Coureurs des Bois holds a meeting and shoot on the 2nd Sunday of every month at 1:00 PM. Anyone is welcome to participate in the shoot, but must be dressed in historic clothes and shoot a flintlock muzzleloader.

http://www.fortdechartres.us


Mercy Street Premiers on PBS

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Civil War Drama, Mercy Street, Premiers on PBS this Sunday, January 17, 2016

Based on real events, Mercy Street goes beyond the front lines of the Civil War and into the chaotic world of the Mansion House Hospital in Union-occupied Alexandria, Virginia. 

Mercy Street follows the lives of two volunteer nurses on opposing sides of the Civil War — New England abolitionist Mary Phinney and Confederate supporter Emma Green. The Green family’s luxury hotel in Alexandria, VA, has been transformed into Mansion House, a Union Army hospital tending to the war’s wounded. The series, being shot in the Richmond and Petersburg, VA areas, is inspired by memoirs and letters from real doctors and nurse volunteers at the hospital in Alexandria, the longest occupied Confederate city of the war.

Visit the Mercy Street site.


Restoring the Texas

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The Texas, made famous in a 1950s Disney movie, was one of the players in the war's Great Locomotive Chase in April 1862. Its crew, running the locomotive backward, caught up with Union raiders who tried to destroy track between Big Shanty (now Kennesaw) and Chattanooga, Tennessee.

The raiders achieved little success, and eight of the nearly two dozen captured participants, disguised as civilians, were later hanged in Atlanta as spies. 

"We want to show it as the hard-working engine that it was, not just as one of the engines in the Great Locomotive Chase," Gordon Jones, the history center's senior military historian, said in a statement.

Read the full story here:

Do the locomotion: Famous Civil War engine taking ride on highway


Missouri Civil War Monument

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Associated Press

COLUMBIA, Mo. • Missouri lawmakers have set aside $375,000 to make repairs to a Civil War monument at a Mississippi historic site, but state Department of Natural Resources officials say the money is coming from the wrong fund and can't be used for that purpose.

The Missouri monument at the Vicksburg National Battlefield needs stone and metal work, which heritage groups want to be finished in time for an October 2017 rededication ceremony on the 100th anniversary of its unveiling, the Columbia Daily Tribune reported.

Missouri's monument is the first — and for nearly 100 years the only — memorial honoring Confederate and Union soldiers who fought at Vicksburg, Miss.

Lawmakers appropriated money from the State Parks Earnings Fund, which consists of cash donations and revenue from contracts and concessions at state parks.

The DNR "doesn't oppose" efforts to restore the monument, acting general counsel Marty Miller wrote on Friday to Dale Crandell, commander of the Sons of Union Veterans Westport Camp 64 in Kansas City.

"However ... the State Parks Earnings Fund is simply not an appropriate funding mechanism for this project, which is located outside of Missouri on land neither owned nor controlled by the department," Miller wrote.

That decision could endanger the timeline for completing work before the centennial, Crandell said.

State legislators return to work on Jan. 6, but if a new funding source is needed, no money can be spent until after July 1 unless Gov. Jay Nixon requests it in a supplemental appropriation.

DNR's decision requires more explanation once budget hearings begin, said Senate Appropriations Chairman Kurt Schaefer, a Columbia Republican.

"I think it would be appropriate to find another source of funds if that is the problem," Schaefer said.

Missouri was deeply divided over the issue of slavery and which side to take in the Civil War. More than 100,000 men fought for the Union in federal and state units, while more than 40,000 fought for the Confederacy.

Missouri taxpayers paid $40,000 to install the monument in 1917.

"I think the legislature wanted to see Missouri represented well in that monument," Schaefer said.